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Get Back to Nature

With summer vacation just around the corner, finish up the school year by escaping the stuffy classroom and bringing learning outdoors. Get a hands-on start to fun in the sun by changing up your surroundings and getting in touch with nature. Be inspired to create an outdoor classroom with these free activities and adventurous ideas.

Be Hands-On with Nature

Learn about the power of wind with a home-made weather vane. Build your own weather vane using materials found in everyday classrooms. Take your creation outside and test it in the elements. Find out the direction the wind is blowing and how often it changes. Study the different kinds of rocks and see how many you can find. Go outside and look for as many different rocks as possible. Compare them to the ones in the list below. Explain where each rock was found and what type it is.

Click an image to see a free worksheet, or click the cover image to see more from this ready-made resource.

              

Witness the Power of Nature

Examine the effect that light and air has on green plants. Conduct an experiment that shows the difference between plants exposed to sunlight with plants kept in the dark. Continue the experiment over several weeks, marking the changes between the two plants, finally leading up to transpiration. Head outdoors and make tree rubbings of bark. Take a walk around the neighborhood and note the different colors of trees. See how many different patterns and textures are found in nature.

Click an image to see a free worksheet, or click the cover image to see more from this ready-made resource.

              

Check out our pinterest board for more great ideas: https://www.pinterest.com/ccpinteractive/outdoor-classroom/

Get Caught Reading This Month

May is Get Caught Reading Month. Encourage students to open a book and experience how much fun it is to read. Since 1999, the Association of American Publishers (AAP) have worked to promote this nationwide campaign. Whether it's a Newbery-winning story or a literary classic, there's something for everyone inside a book. Take this initiative one step further by testing student comprehension as they read. Take a look at some of our suggestions below, and don't forget to grab your free downloads.

Grades 3-4
Get inspired to make up your very own word with Frindle. In a journal prompt, students use their critical thinking skills to predict what career Nick will have when he grows up. Help design a miracle to save the life of a pig in Charlotte's Web. Students describe how Wilbur tried to make himself look 'radiant', and predict what Charlotte's 'masterpiece' will be. Travel to a land of giants with The BFG. Students reflect on how the story ends and create their own giant to live in this world.

Click an image to see a selected novel study guide from our ready-made resources.

              

Grades 5-6

Find out what it was like to live in Ancient Egypt in The Egypt Game. Students write a message to a classmate using Egyptian hieroglyphics. Become stranded in the wilderness and learn to survive in Hatchet. Students complete a chart detailing the events Brian survives, what his reactions were, and what he learned from them. Travel Through the Looking-Glass to a fantastic world with interesting characters. Using details gathered throughout the novel, students draw a map of the looking-glass world.

Click an image to see a selected novel study guide from our ready-made resources.

              

Grades 7-8

Solve a who-done-it mystery to claim a fortune in The Westing Game. Follow the clues in the story to solve the game before any of the characters. Experience the tragic tale of The Boy in the Striped Pajamas. Students explore Bruno's state of mind by detailing the lesson he learns from his conversation with Maria, and what experiences he thinks he shares with her. Become shipwrecked on The Cay, and find out what it takes to survive. Students use the description Timothy provides to Phillip to research the tea bird and draw a picture of it along with a fact sheet.

Click an image to see a selected novel study guide from our ready-made resources.

              

Grades 9-12

Spend a few nights with The Old Man and the Sea, battling with a fish and your own will-power. Students explore the character of Santiago by indicating what he said that suggested big fish were nearby, and what this says about his experience. Enter a post-apocalyptic and desolate wasteland that will challenge you to survive along The Road. Students make predictions of the disaster that destroyed the world based on clues left by the author. Explore the downfall of civilization while surviving with peers on an island in Lord of the Flies. Students map out Ralph's mindset by identifying some of the things that he reflects on.

Click an image to see a selected novel study guide from our ready-made resources.

              

Free Downloads

Meet Matilda and the power she has to move things with her mind. Research famous magic tricks throughout history, and find out how they are done. Imagine a society where The Giver holds all the memories of human kind. This is no easy job. Students choose a career they are interested in and research all that is involved with it. Travel back to medieval times with Crispin: The Cross of Lead. Learn about the real-life figure of John Ball and his role during this era.

Click an image to see a free worksheet from our ready-made novel study guides.

              

Check out our pinterest board for more great free worksheets: https://www.pinterest.com/ccpinteractive/travel-with-literature/

Celebrate Earth Month

April is Earth Month. Take this month to celebrate all things Environment and Earth Sciences, all while leading up to Earth Day on April 22. Here are some tips and ideas to promote the environment all month long.

Carbon Footprint
Learn all about your carbon footprint at home, at school and in the community. Calculate your own carbon footprint, then get tips on how to lower it. Start an initiative at your school to encourage a smaller carbon footprint. Then, reach a little higher by implementing this initiative within the community. Get your FREE carbon footprint calculator here.

Click an image to see a selected lesson plan from our ready-made resources.

              

Go Green

Spend some time in the dirt and turn your thumb green. Start a community garden with your class. Grow some wildflowers to help the bee population. Grow some vegetables and cook up a stew. Promote clean air by planting a tree. Teach your students the importance of responsibility by taking care of a plant and watching it grow.

Click an image to see a selected lesson plan from our ready-made resources.

              

Get to Know the Planet Earth

No Earth Month is complete with a study on the planet Earth. Go deep and get to know what makes up the planet with a look at plate tectonics, rocks and minerals. Go to the surface and discover the different ecosystems that inhabit the planet. Go to the sky and find out how the air, wind and atmosphere affect the planet.

Click an image to see a selected lesson plan from our ready-made resources.

              

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

Go back to the basics and excel at recycling. Implement a recycling program in your classroom, and encourage students to extend this to their home. Learn about product life cycles and come up with alternative methods to decrease waste. Study the effects of climate change and get tips on how to reduce it.

Click an image to see a selected lesson plan from our ready-made resources.

              

Life on Planet Earth

Get to know all the ins and outs of life on planet Earth—from the smallest organism to the largest being. Start with a look at cells and what life needs to prosper on Earth. Start viewing the environment as a living being that needs to be nurtured. Then, extend outward by looking at the different habitats that exist on the planet.

Click an image to see a selected lesson plan from our ready-made resources.

              

Check out our pinterest board for more great Earth ideas: https://www.pinterest.com/ccpinteractive/the-environment/

By Danielle Andrew

The following riddle is claimed to have been written by Einstein as a boy. It's also sometimes attributed to Lewis Carrol, although there's no evidence that either of them actually wrote it. Either way, it's fiendishly clever and is popularly called "Einstein's riddle". It's rumored that only 2% of the world can solve it.

See if you can figure it out:

There are five houses in five different colors in a row. In each house lives a person with a different nationality. The five owners drink a certain type of beverage, smoke a certain brand of cigar and keep a certain pet. No owners have the same pet, smoke the same brand of cigar, or drink the same beverage. Other facts:

1. The Brit lives in the red house. 
2. The Swede keeps dogs as pets. 
3. The Dane drinks tea. 
4. The green house is on the immediate left of the white house. 
5. The green house's owner drinks coffee. 
6. The owner who smokes Pall Mall rears birds. 
7. The owner of the yellow house smokes Dunhill. 
8. The owner living in the center house drinks milk. 
9. The Norwegian lives in the first house. 
10. The owner who smokes Blends lives next to the one who keeps cats. 
11. The owner who keeps the horse lives next to the one who smokes Dunhill. 
12. The owner who smokes Bluemasters drinks beer. 
13. The German smokes Prince. 
14. The Norwegian lives next to the blue house. 
15. The owner who smokes Blends lives next to the one who drinks water. 

The question is: who owns the fish?

There are no tricks, all it requires is simple logic. Those that haven’t the patience to work it out can watch PoETheeds' video, which takes you through the process of solving it step by step. 

Not patience enough? See how to solve it step by step here.

With great power comes great responsibility. We present this poster originally published by Edutopia on the Proactive Knowledge in the digital world but more specifically in the classroom:


To download poster, click here.

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